Pakistani Islamic Council Says Husbands Can ‘Lightly Beat’ Wives

Pakistani Islamic Council Says Husbands Can ‘Lightly Beat’ Wives

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Pakistani Islamic Council Says Husbands Can ‘Lightly Beat’ Wives
Pakistani Islamic Council Says Husbands Can ‘Lightly Beat’ Wives

Pakistan’s Council of Islamic Ideology (CII) recently published a proposal for the resolution of conflicts between spouses. Under the bill, the resulting Pakistan Express-Tribune and confirmed theWashington Post:

“The husband should be allowed to slightly beat his wife if she challenges his team and refuses to dress in accordance with his wishes; turns down demand sexual intercourse without any religious justification or not to take a bath after intercourse or menses.”

CII has prepared a proposal in response to a recently enacted a law that would provide protection for women against abusive husbands. The law was passed in the Punjab, Pakistan’s most populous province.

Council, which bases its recommendations on Sharia law as well as in favor of the legalization of domestic violence if the woman “cooperates with strangers, said loud enough that it can easily be heard by strangers, and provides financial support to people without taking the consent of her husband “wrote theExpress-Tribune.

As the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and the Council was established to advise the legislature if the proposed law is “un-Islamic,” the language of the proposal is even more ominous. In the end, council members instructed the legislators who challenge their recommendations with blasphemy in Pakistan is punishable by death.

But local activists say that the proposal has little chance of becoming law.

“[The proposal] shows a decadent way of thinking of some elements that are part of the council,” said human rights activist Farzana Bari Washington Post. “The proposed bill has nothing to do with Islam and just bring a bad name to the country.”

In a sense, Bari rights: While the bill as this paint Pakistan as objectively ago, theWashington Post notes that in many respects, the country is more advanced than some other Islamic countries. For instance, he became the Prime Minister of Pakistan in 1988, Benazir Bhutto, Pakistan became the first Muslim-majority country to establish a female head of state.

In addition, there are no formal restrictions on women in the country could be worn in public places – and this is not the case, when Pakistani women are forbidden to drive a car. However, many of these comparative freedoms that are almost exclusively women in urban areas.

For Bari, one of the ways to change it, the dissolution of CII once and for all, she told the Post.

“Violence against women can not be accepted,” Bari said. “It’s time for the nation to confront the people who come to these proposed laws.”

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